Jul 3, 2020

El Nido’s revenue code stirs mixed reactions

Business Permits and Licensing Office (BPLO) Vernie Bero, who admitted the imposition is controversial, said it is only like that because it is the first time people have heard of it.

EL NIDO, Palawan — This town’s implementation of its revised revenue code has gathered unfavorable reactions in social media after “work permits” or “occupational permits” were required this year.

Business Permits and Licensing Office (BPLO) Vernie Bero, who admitted the imposition is controversial, said it is only like that because it is the first time people have heard of it.

“Medyo sa ngayon talagang kontrobersyal ‘yan kasi first time sa pandinig na ni-launch na itong occupational permit pero kung mapapansin niyo ‘yan before sa mga nakaraang mga taon tuwing magre-renew ‘yong mga business establishments, isasama na kaagad ‘yan sa mga resibo,” Bero told Palawan News in an interview.

“Hindi lang napapansin ng mga empleyado kasi binabayaran ‘yan nila. Kung mapapansin niyo dito sa article, ang work permit dapat ay indibidwal kasi, pinaka passport nila ito sa pag-apply ng trabaho,” he added.

Bero pointed out that in the revised local revenue code, the imposition of fees on every person who engages in the practice of his or her occupation or calling is stated in detail.

To date, his office has not received any formal complaints. However, he admitted that in social media, this came out an issue.

“Wala kaming nare-receive na reklamo kahit sulat man lang. Napapansin lang namin sa FB, pero opinion nila ‘yon, iba-iba kasi ang diskarte ng mga tao… kailangan lang namin i-implement ang mga natutulog lang na mga batas,” he added.

Bero said the BPLO is now strictly checking all documents, as well as the work permits of employees and the number of workers in El Nido, as part of their data gathering and tracking.

He said this is advantageous for their town because it will have data about its workforce. They will also ensure that business establishments are following the municipal ordinance on the 70-30 workforce sharing.

According to the ordinance, he said, establishments should hire 70 percent of its workforce from El Nido and 30 percent from outside.

Bero reminded all stakeholders in El Nido to be in attendance whenever there are important meetings to ensure they understand municipal policies that are vague to them.

He said these meetings are opportunities for them to clarify what they cannot understand instead of airing out their disappointments in the social media.

“Sa una, ganoon na talaga may resistance ‘yan. Pero sana bago mag-comment sa labas, kausapin niyo mga tao, willing naman tayo ipaliwanag ‘yan at bukas din ang aming tanggapin sa kanilang mga katanungan,” he said.

“Ang batas kung natutulog lang at di ini-implement ay walang kwenta ‘yan. Tayo naman bilang kawani ng gobyerno na sinasahuran ng mamamayan, trabaho natin na mag-trabaho at i-implement ito. Nire-require natin sa bawat establishment na bago sila tatanggap ng empleyado, check muna nila kung sila ay may occupational permit o ‘work permit,” Bero added.

He said they understand public sentiments, but they are only doing their jobs.

Bero said establishments in El Nido are safe if they only hire applicants with work permits.

On the other hand, businessman Renato Tenorio believes there is

“I think parang may mali sa implementasyon nito, dahil you could just imagine lahat ng mga tao ay kailangang kumuha ng work permit. Papaano na lang itong nasa laylayan na mas apektado nito?” Tenorio said.

Tenorio said he does not understand why even a dishwasher will need to get a work permit when he or she is only earning a minimal salary.

As stated in Article 1 of the revised revenue code, the rate of the fee per annum is P600 for workers catering and attending to the daily needs of inquiring or paying public, food, and eatery establishments, to include all occupation or calling subject to periodic inspection, surveillance and or regulations by the municipal mayor like auctioneer, barber, beautician, animal trainer, electronic technician, magician, make-up artist, masseur attendant, cook, carpentry, mechanic and the like.

Not included in the rates are other fees and clearances collected from the barangay like cedula, police and court clearances, health fee, and others.

 

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